Thyroid Disorder

January 1, 2021
Thyroid Disorder

Thyroid diseases are widely associated with urban populations and are dependent on unhealthy lifestyle, stress, exposure to various chemicals. If not controlled properly this may lead to detrimental outcomes in at-risk individuals.

Patients with hypothyroidism have an increased risk of cardiovascular diseases, osteoporosis, obesity, celiac diseases whereas individuals with hyperthyroidism suffer from high blood pressure, chronic fatigue and weight loss1.

Hyperthyroidism occurs ten times more frequently in females than males and is prevalent in 2 to 3 percent of the adult population2,3.

Many recent studies have shown a positive effect of dietary interventions on thyroid functioning. A strict elimination diet to soothe the gut inflammation, restore digestive health and address autoimmune diseases from a holistic approach could be the best way to prevent or treat thyroid diseases4.

In a study conducted in 2015, it was found that eliminating gluten from a diet with supplements of vital minerals and vitamins for four months was able to reverse the complications of the thyroid5.

A complete thyroid profile helps to determine whether an individual is suffering from a thyroid disorder.

  • Serum thyrotropin values (TSH) of 0.5-6 IU/mL is considered a normal range.
  • T3 the values should be in the range of 80-180 ng/dL.
  • T4 the values are 4.6-12 ng/dL respectively6,7.
  • It is important to note that the TSH levels in persons aged above 70 years will be higher than the normal range.

REFERENCES:

  1. Jonklaas J, Bianco AC, Bauer AJ, Burman KD, Cappola AR, et al. (2014) Guidelines for the Treatment of Hypothyroidism: Prepared by the American Thyroid Association Task Force on Thyroid Hormone Replacement | Thyroid, 24:1670-1751

  2. Thyroid autoimmunity as a window to autoimmunity: An explanation for sex differences in the prevalence of thyroid autoimmunity, Journal of Theoretical Biology 375: 95-100.

  3. Brent GA (2008) Clinical practice. Graves' disease. New Eng J Med 358: 2594-2605

  4. Tan Kar Soon and Poh Wei Ting, Thyroid Diseases and Diet Control, J Nutr Disorders Ther 2018,8:1.

  5. J. Bruin Rugge, MD, MPH, Christina Bougatsos, MPH, Roger Chou, MD, Screening and Treatment of Thyroid Dysfunction: An Evidence Review for the US Preventive Services Task Force | Annals of Internal Medicine, Jan(2015),162:1;34-35.

  6. Smith et al, Lab tests online; American Association for Clinical Chemistry (AACC)2001-2020 .clinical Hematology. 14th ed. Greer J, editor. Philadelphia, PA: Wolters Kluwer: 2019.

  7. Wintrobe's Cl Henry's Clinical Diagnosis and Management by Laboratory Methods. 22nd ed. McPherson R, Pincus M, eds. Philadelphia, PA: Elsevier Saunders; 2011.

  • Hypothyroidism
  • Medical Nutrition Therapy
  • Hyperthyroidism
  • TSH
  • Metabolism